Community-led Waste Management

Back To Projects

This project, which was started in 2013, is designed to improve the sanitation and waste management systems of the Old Fadama community. It has an income generating component which will help sustain this and other activities being initiated by the Ghana Federation. It is a partnership initiative of the Ghana Federation of the Urban Poor (GHAFUP) and Old Fadama Development Association (OFADA).

Location: Old Fadama, Accra, Ghana

Deliverables:

The project, which has been halted temporarily, involves door-to-door collection of waste by the youth of Old Fadama and provision of hygiene and sanitation education to community residents to help improve waste management and overall health and well-being in the community. Waste collected from houses is carted by tricycles and wheelbarrows to the project’s sanitation site, where a skip container has been provided. The refuse from skip containers are finally lifted by the city authority AMA at a fee. The waste collected from the community is sorted at receptacle points (central container sites). The plastic and paper is be bagged and sold to the local market. Arrangements will be made with the Accra Metropolitan Assembly (ACA) to lift the skip containers which serves as final disposal sites for the tricycle and wheel barrows. A skip truck is then deployed to haul the waste to a final disposal site (land fill).

Community capacity:

The project management team is comprised of two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time officers. These officers coordinate the core project activities. Members of the management team are predominantly residents of Old Fadama. In addition the management team, eight (8) community members will be trained to work as health educators. They will educate households on environmental sanitation to maintain a good environment and quality health. They will also recruit the unemployed youth of Old Fadama to undertake house-to-house waste collection.

Scale:

The project is implemented at the local (read settlement) scale but has the potential to be scaled across to other informal settlements in the city. 

Impact:

The project's impact is evident primarily in the decrease of waste littering the settlement. The project has also played a role in improving the general health and well-being of community members as a result of living in a cleaner environment. 

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$26,050.00

Market Generated Returns:

None to date.

Costs recovered from community:

None to date.

Farouk Braimah rabiu_farouk@hotmail.com (+233) 21 682 896 View Website
Project social media channels:


Project information updated: 19 February 2016

Project in depth

Detailed Information

The Ghanaian Alliance of the Ghana Homeless People's Federation (GHAFUP) and People's Dialogue on Human Settlements (PDHS) estimate Old Fadama has a population of over seventy-nine (79,000) and a population density of two thousand five hundred and twenty-four (2,524) persons per hectare (2010). It is the largest slum in Accra and generates, according to Alliance estimates, 39.5 tonnes of waste daily. Old Fadama is not recognized by city authorities as a human settlement and therefore its residents are often left out of waste management interventions. The settlement has no arrangements for solid waste collection and disposal. All solid waste generated from the community is either used to fill depressions in the area as a way of reclaiming more land or is disposed of indiscriminately around or into the Korle lagoon. Liquid waste and night soil is also discharged illegally into the Korle Lagoon. Such practices pose a serious threat to the health and dignity of the people living in Old Fadama as well as the ecological health of the lagoon.

Deliverables:

To fulfill its goal of collecting waste door-to-door, the project has obtained eighty (80) litre bins, two (2) skips, and twenty (20) wheelbarrows. The beneficiaries of the project are eight (8) households, seventeen (17) commercial bath houses as well as fifty-five (55) food vendors and provision stores. 

Community capacity:

A number of new savings groups have been formed since the project's inception. The majority of beneficiaries are not current Federation members but the project aims to mobilze these people to join the Federation.

The management committee has been re-constituted to steer or manage the affairs of the waste project in a more efficient manner having identified problems.

Scale:

The successful implementation of this project will set a precedent, which will enable the Federation and the Old Fadama Development Association to leverage resources such as more robust equipment from other stakeholders including the local government to improve the waste management and sanitation conditions in Old Fadama in particular and other informal settlements in Accra in general.

Impact:

The project aims to have a postive impact on the waste management policy of the Accra Metropolitan Assembly. It is hoped that the successful implementation of the project will get the city authorities on board with the distribution of waste bins for households as it is happening in other sub metros in the metropolis.

The project will strive for partnerships that will boost the Federation's capacity while maintaining its autonomy. Moreover, it will promote the comparative advantages of Federated communities in Accra Metropolis in undertaking waste management projects and will also identify other strategic areas for collaboration with the city’s sanitation programme and projects.

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$26,050. Of this amount, US$2,620.00 went towards project linked technical assistance and the remainder went towards capital expenses. 

Market Generated Returns:

As of December 2013, US$680.00 had been collected from the project. This money has been reinvested in the project to play for waste collection and fuel the bola taxi that collects waste. 

Costs recovered from community:

Beneficiary households contribute to the project through a ‘pay as you dump’ approach. Fees are collected from households when refuse is collected. The revenue earned will be used for loan repayment and to cover overhead costs. This will ensure the sustainability of the project. 

Bradlow, B. (2010). Old Fadama Residents Count Themselves. [Online]. Available: http://sdinet.org/2010/06/old-fadama-residents-count-themselves/
 
Braimah, F. (2011). A Decade of Struggles and Lessons in Old Fadama. [Online]. Available: http://sdinet.org/2011/11/a-decade-of-struggles-and-lessons-in-old-fadama/.
 
Jafaru, M. Y. & Abdul-Jalil, Y. (2015). AMA demolishes Structures of Old Fadama Returnees. [Online]. Available: http://www.graphic.com.gh/news/general-news/49931-ama-demolishes-structures-of-old-fadama-returnees.html
 
MacPherson, A.K. (2012). Negotiating the Right to Stay: A Community-led Process in Old Fadama. [Online]. Available: http://sdinet.org/2012/01/negotiating-the-right-to-stay-a-community-led-process-in-old-fadama/
 
Owusu, M. (2013). Community-managed Reconstruction after the 2012 Fire in Old Fadama, Ghana, Environment and Urbanisation, 25(1): 243 - 248. [Online]. Available: http://eau.sagepub.com/content/25/1/243.full
 
[VIDEO] The Bartlett Development Planning Unit. (2012). Dialogues in Development: MSc ESD Students, Fire in Old Fadama, Accra, Ghana. [Online]. Available: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQ4FhG5rrd0
 

Funding Information

Raised:

$26,050.00

Funding type:

Grant funding

Implementing Partners

Ghana Homeless People's Federation


People's Dialogue on Human Settlements