Kinawataka Market Sanitation

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This sanitation unit, which includes toilets, showers, and water points, serves as an informal market largely comprised of women selling vegetables and fish. The unit served as the beginning of a negotiation with Council to upgrade the entire market. 

Location: Kinawataka, Kampala, Uganda

Deliverables:

The initial plan was achieved, albeit with some delays and need for additional funding. The Federation constructed a sanitation unit with six (6) stances (two with showers), a urinal and a stance for people with disabilities (PWD). A community hall was planned for the second floor. The unit also included a small store and a water point and water harvesting system. The building footprint is sixty square meters (60m2). 

Community capacity:

While the Federation built its capacity through participation in and monitoring of the construction process, the major challenge for the community in this respect was their failure to organize and mobilize the twenty percent (20%) contribution for the project. This was largely the result of the way the project was negotiated, which was between national Federation leadership, SDI, and Government. Ahead of the project the Federation had not mobilized communities in the settlement and this work proceeded more slowly (which was to be expected) than the project preparations. The opportunity for the Federation in Kampala to partner with Government in the upgrading of multiple informal markets could not be delayed while the community contribution was raised. The Federation decided to complete the first floor with the money it had and figure out how to finish the community hall at a later date. Emphasis was placed on organizing the women in the settlement to save, conduct profiling, engage Government and participate in the project development meaningfully. The community never made a twenty percent (20%) contribution, but it is managing the project and is now well organized to spearhead future development in the settlement.

Scale:

The plan to expand to other markets in Nakawa is still on the table, however it is now part of the Federation and Kampala Capital City Authority’s (KCCA) larger effort to upgrade informal markets in Kampala. However, the Federation did replicate the project in one other settlement in Kampala and three other municipalities.

Impact:

The intended impact was indeed achieved. The Federation designed an enhanced sanitation model with innovative technical and social components. The unit harvests water – reducing the resources required to service the unit with water. The community hall element has also had tremendous impact and is now the command center for the Kinawataka Upgrading Project, hosts the LC1 Chairman, and Nakawa Federation regional office. The project impacted the local community and the Federation at large (through exchanges to the project) with respect to its capacity to negotiate space, inspire local and international Federation groups to undertake such projects and strategize thoughtfully on negotiations with Government. It became a model project for sanitation solutions in extreme;y dense places and technical support from an SDI architect led to creative design elements that improved light and air flow and made the building more attractive and cost effective.  

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI Contributed US$15,600.

Other Contributions:

US$6,000 (LME supporting partnerships).

State Subsidy:

Land valued then atUS $4,800. The present day value could be as high as US$10,000, especially with the planned upgrade.

Market Generated Returns:

None to date.

Skye Dobson skye@sdinet.org (+256) 312 107 643 View Website
Project social media channels:


Project information updated: 26 October 2015

Project in depth

Detailed Information

Kampala has been a difficult place for the Federation to forge a strong partnership with Government owing to the complicated nature of politics in the capital. The transition from Kampala City Council to the Kampala Capital City Authority (KCCA) was drawn out and it was unclear which officials had what role and whether they would keep their jobs. Serendipitously, around the time KCCA began to settle, the Federation was coming out of three (3) years as the key community stakeholder in the Government of Uganda’s, Transforming Settlements of the Urban Poor in Uganda (TSUPU) program and had built tremendous collective capacity and a solid reputation, which made the work on engaging the new KCCA considerably easier.
 
In one of Kampala’s five (5) divisions – Nawaka – the Federation’s relationship with the Mayor survived the political turmoil and his reorganized technical team was also quick to support the allocation of land to the Federation for the construction of a sanitation unit to serve the market vendors and surrounding residents. The project was the Federation’s second in Kampala in which the Government allocated land for a communal facilities (the first in Kisenyi) and therefore aimed to set a precedent for partnership, creative sanitation solutions, and community managed public facilities. It operates in an informal economy context, which would later become a key focus of the Federation’s work.
 
 
 
 

Deliverables:

The initial plan was to construct a sanitation unit with six (6) stances (two with showers), a urinal and a stance for people with disabilities (PWD). OA community hall was planned for the second floor. The unit also included a small store, a water point and water harvesting system. The building footprint was planned  to be sixty square meters (60m2). 

Community capacity:

The plan was for the local community to participate in the design, contribute unskilled labor, undertake facility management and monitoring. In addition the community would be involved in negotiations with Government and regular progress reporting to the Council. 

Scale:

The concept at the beginning of the project was to scale the sanitation units to all marketplaces in Nakawa. 

Impact:

The intended impact was to set a precedent for community designed and managed sanitation units in Kampala (continuing the work started in Kisenyi) and informal settlement upgrading more broadly.

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contribution was US$15,600.

State Subsidy:

The State subsidy was in the form of land and technical support to the value of US$5,200.

Market Generated Returns:

 Toilet fees, water fees, hall rental.

Costs recovered from community:

Repayments from user fees over six (6) years at eight (8%) per annum.

Bachmayer, G. (2013). Improving Sanitation in Kinawataka Market, Uganda. [Online]. Available: http://sdinet.org/2013/02/improving-sanitation-in-kinawataka-market-uganda
 
Dobson, S. (2012). Sanitation Update: Sanitation Unit in Kisenyi III, Kampala. [Online]. Available: https://sites.google.com/site/actogetheruganda/blog/untitledpost-3
 
Dobson, S. (2013). Creating Communities of Slum Dwellers in Uganda. Prospects. [Online]. Available: http://go.worldbank.org/TYVZFBN850
 
Kasozi, E. (2006). Uganda: Uhuru Promises to Improve Kisenyi Sanitation, The Daily Monitor (Kampala), [Online]. Available: http://allafrica.com/stories/200603160799.html
 
Katende, N. (2009). Kisenyi Slum Gets Sh6 Billion Sanitation Project, New Vision. [Online]. Available: http://www.newvision.co.ug/PA/8/220/701717.
 
SDI. (2013). A People-Centred Approach to Citywide Sanitation. [Online]. Available: http://www.urbanafrica.net/urban-voices/people-centred-approach-citywide-sanitation/

Funding Information

Raised:

$15,600.00

Implementing Partners

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation


AcTogether Uganda


National Slum Dwellers Federation of Uganda (NSDFU)