Planning for Kisenyi Land Sharing Project

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Focus Areas: Housing

This project, which began in 2013, sees the Ugandan Alliance receive a grant for technical assistance to plan for Kisenyi III land sharing project. Land sharing entails the private owner giving the Federation a piece of his land. Funds for this project are used to support the structure owner and tenants negotiation process, beneficiary registration, and community participation in the design process. The project involves the construction of three blocks: Revenue Generating Block, Common Block and Resettlement Block. The Revenue Generating Block will be 3 256m2 and will cost US$1,302. The Common Block will be 7 258m2 and will cost US$306,800. The Resettlement Block will be 3 235m2 and will consist of 119 units of 3 varying sizes (15m2, 21m2 and 36m2). The planning of this block will cost a total of US$1,294. Each residential unit will be equipped with a private toilet and a balcony, and will provide residents with the freedom to design their own interior space. The commercial floor will be rented out to local and international businesses, and will help finance the structure through cross subsidies. The roof of the structure will be designated as a communal space, as well as a site for solar panels and the drying of briquettes.  The Alliance is negotiating with the Ministry of Lands, Housing and Urban Development with a view of getting support on surveying the land. Funds for a topographical survey and boundary opening have thus not been expensed as we have been trying to secure a commitment from government to support the effort.  

Location: Kisenyi, Kampala, Uganda

Deliverables:

A plan for one durable mixed-use structure, which will feature:

  • a ground level for 44 commercial units (for a total of 3 256m2), and; 
  • three additional stories for 81 residential units (for a total of 10 493m2), designated for Federation members. 

Community capacity:

An important part of the negotiation process with the landowner was an SDI exchange to India where the local Federation has considerable experience with land-sharing projects. The exchange helped both the landowner and the Federation better understand the intricacies of land-sharing. To build a coalition of support for the initiative, the Federation also invited KCDF officials, the Minister of Lands, Housing, and Urban Development, as well as Uganda’s Commissioner for Urban Development. 

Scale:

The proposed project is local in nature but it can be scaled up in the surrounding areas and more broadly at a national level. Its exploration of cross-subsidisation as a type of financing method that could be useful in the implementation of land-sharing redevelopment projects such as this is innovative. Its reduction of the need for public funds, particularly when the land in question is prime real estate, means that more self-sufficient and revenue generating projects can be undertaken.

The Federation and ACTogether Uganda have been working with students (planners and architects) from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), the New School University New York, Makerere University, independent architects from AP-TECH, the Ministry of Lands Housing and Urban Development (MLHUD) technocrats and the SDI to move the process forward. 

Impact:

The potential impact of this project is huge. It presents an alternative to the notion that eviction is a necessary stage for upgrading. It is an example of how slum upgrading mechanisms can alleviate mass evictions. Upon completion, this project will serve as an example of the fruitfulness of public-private partnerships in slums and hopefully result in an increase in these types of partnerships for the betterment of the lives of slum dwellers. 

 

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$14,600.00 towards technical assistance. 

Resources Leveraged:

A model house exhibition, attended by the Kampala City Authority, the Ministry of Lands, Housing, and Urban Development, financial institutions and urban development NGOs, has helped to push this negotiation forward and leverage support for incremental housing as part of a land-sharing project. 

Market Generated Returns:

None to date. 

Costs recovered from community:

The community participated in this project by conducting the enumeration in 2011 of the 1.6 acre piece of land. The enumeration findings show that there are seventy-five (75) households and one hundred and forty-seven (147) residents in the area, seven of whom own structures on the site. 

Skye Dobson skye@sdinet.org (+256) 312 107 643 View Website
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Project information updated: 26 October 2015

Project in depth

Detailed Information

The Ugandan Alliance of National Slum Dweller’s Federation of Uganda (NSDFU) and AcTogether embarked on this project in 2013, in preparation for the Kisenyi III land-sharing project.  The Kisenyi III project was started in 2011. The Federation conducted an enumeration of the 1.6 acre piece of land and discovered there are 75 households and 147 residents. The Federation sought technical support from SDI architects with experience in the area of land-sharing to generate possible housing designs. The Alliance has been working with students (planners and architects) from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), New School University New York, Makerere University, Independent architects from AP-TECH, the Ministry of Lands Housing and Urban Development technocrats, and SDI to move the process forward.

Deliverables:

The completion of a structure plan for the Kisenyi III land sharing project. The structure will be a durable mixed-use structure, which will feature a ground level for forty-four (44) commercial units (for a total of 3 256m2), as well as an additional three stories for eighty-one (81) residential units (for a total of 10 493m2), designated for Federation members. Each residential unit will be equipped with a private toilet and a balcony, and will provide residents with the freedom to design their own interior space. The commercial floor will be rented out to local and international businesses, and will help finance the structure through the form of cross subsidies. The roof of the structure will be designated as a communal space, as well as a site for solar panels and the drying of briquettes. In addition, the building seeks to be sustainable, and will match appropriately with the topography of the grounds, and will be protected from environmental events such as flooding, which the area is prone to. Finally, Mulangwa’s property will be upgraded to feature a modern home for him and his family, as well as a personal business. Proposed public space within the plot plans to implement flora, fauna and urban furniture. Parking is also a strong consideration. It will provide organized entry to the ground level thus making it more attractive. For a commercial building to be in good standing with the city, one (1) parking spot for every forty (40) square meters of commercial space is required. Phase one of implementation will include the demolition of all existing structures, to be conducted by slum dwellers. Phase two presents incremental construction, which will provide minimal disturbance in the relocation of tenants. 

Scale:

The proposed project is local in nature but it can be scaled up in the surrounding areas and more broadly at a national level. Its exploration of cross-subsidisation as a type of financing method that could be useful in the implementation of land-sharing redevelopment projects such as this is innovative. Its reduction of the need for public funds, particularly when the land in question is prime real estate, means that more self-sufficient and revenue generating projects can be undertaken.

If successfully implemented and fully rented out upon completion, the project will direclty impact the 75 households who are currently residing on the plot. These households, together with the rest of the community will benefit from the movement of more formal and established local and international businesses into the area. 

Impact:

The potential impact of this project is huge. It presents an alternative to the notion that eviction is a necessary stage for upgrading. It is an example of how slum upgrading mechanisms can alleviate mass evictions. Upon completion, this project will serve as an example of the fruitfulness of public-private partnerships in slums and hopefully result in an increase in these types of partnerships for the betterment of the lives of slum dwellers. 

This land-sharing redevelopment project also has the potential to shift policies on slum upgrading in Uganda. As an essential component of the policy environment in any developing country, slum upgrading policies need to be dynamic and allow for innovation in the use of the limited public resources. Projects such as this one necessitate the shift of local policies as they highlight alternative approaches to slum upgrading. 

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$14,600.00. Project funding was given as a grant and is not to be revolved. When the Kisenyi Land Sharing project gets implemented, planned for in this contract, the commercial floor of the unit will be rented out to local and international business. Businesses are to be charged full commercial rates meaning cross subsidizing will help finance the structure.

Market Generated Returns:

None to date.

SD. (2015). This is Kisenya. [Online]. Available: http://sdinet.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/THIS.IS_.KISENYI.pdf.
 
NTNU, UN-HABITAT & Makarere University. (2011). Kisenyi II & III Executive Summaries. Planning for Action - Actions of Planning: Two Field Studies in Kampala, Uganda. [Online]. Available: https://www.ntnu.edu/documents/139680/0/UEP+ex+sum+2011-2012.pdf
 
Urban Uganda. (2013). Kisenyi Land Sharing - Financing. [Online]. Available: http://www.urbanuganda.com/research2013/land-sharing.
 
Urban Uganda. (2013b). Kisenyi Land Sharing - Planning. [Online]. Available: http://www.urbanuganda.com/research2013/kisenyi-landsharing-planning.

Funding Information

Raised:

$14,600.00

Implementing Partners

Sida (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency)


AcTogether Uganda


National Slum Dwellers Federation of Uganda (NSDFU)