Kitwe, Mongu, and Choma Housing: Choma Project

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Focus Areas: Housing

This project, which began in  2008, sees the construction of one hundred one roomed houses in the Kalalushi settlement in KitweMongu and Choma. 

Location: Choma, Zambia

Deliverables:

Secure tenure for one hundred and ninety-two families after the re-demarcation exercise. Proper drainage infrastructure is being installed as well as proper water and sanitation. Two (2) Ecosan toilets have been built to serve as demos for beneficiaries. 

The first phase of construction has begun. In this phase, forty (40) plots are to be constructed. Thus far, sixteen (16) houses have been completed. The remaining twenty-four (24) houses are in various stages of construction. 

Community capacity:

The process is driven by the Federation, who have split into working groups which work on the site on alternate days. In order for the Federation to take full ownership of the project and its processes, they were equipped with basic bookkeeping skills and taught how to calculate interest. The importance of forming project committees to ensure successful running of the project was also stressed to beneficiaries.

Scale:

By and large, the Federation has scaled up from a citywide outlook to a more national one.

Impact:

The ability to engage Government has resulted in the signing of memorandums of understanding in which local authorities have shown commitment to support the Federation's work by acknowledging communal land tenure holding (which is against conventional procedure). Government has also provided technical support at no or minimal cost and continues to listen to poor communities when they knock on the doors of Government offices as well as involving them in planning and implementation of activities. 

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$30,000.00 

Resources Leveraged:

The Alliance continues to receive the supprot from the Choma Municipal Council (CMC), which allows them access to resources such as technical support and equipment at no or minimal cost.

State Subsidy:

The State subsidy in this project was in the form of technical assistance and equipment at minimal or no cost. 

Market Generated Returns:

None to date. 

Costs recovered from community:

None to date although beneficiaries are being encouraged to start making loan repayments even if construction of their houses has not begun yet.

Nelson Ncube nelson@peoplesprocess.org.zm (+260) 211 230 156 View Website
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Project information updated: 15 December 2015

Project in depth

Detailed Information

The Zambian Alliance of the Zambia Homeless and Poor People’s Federation (ZHPPF) and People’s Process on Housing and Poverty in Zambia (PPHPZ) embarked on this project in 2008. It responded to the need to address the lack of decent housing and water and sanitation services.
 

Deliverables:

The intention is to build, incrementally, forty (40) houses in the first phase of construction. 

Community capacity:

Housing forums as well as exchange visits have also been conducted. Government and other stakeholders are invited to the housing forums. This has raised interest in urban poverty and improving living conditions for urban poor communities. The forums are used as a platform to advocate for alternative, low-cost housing technologies and approaches to housing construction such as incremental building.  An example is the use burnt bricks whilst still maintaining the required standard by the local authority. As part of the Habitat forum under auspices of the Ministry of Local Government and Housing (MLGH) we are able make contributions to policy and practice changes as our contributions feed into recommendations that the MLGH submit to parliament. The Town and Country Planning Act and the Housing (Statutory and Improvement Areas Act) are currently being reviewed in parliament.In the past officials from the Council attended an exchange visit to Namibia. This gave the Local Authority insight into what they could achieve through partnership with the Federation to address the housing shortage and the lack of security of tenure. Now the Alliance often visits the Council whenever support is required.

Exchanges have also served to ensure that beneficiaries repay their loans as savings and participation remain a central part of the Federation's activities. 

Scale:

The Federation recognises that there is a greater need for Government to subsidize the housing developments be it through land, material support, or technical assistance in order to make decent housing and better living  more accessible to urban poor communities.

Federation membership continues to grow mainly as a result of mobilisation activities, exchanges, radio programmes, enumerations (settlement profiling) and the mobile health clinics. 

Impact:

The project showcases the possibilities that pooling resources and being committed to the process can achieve. The proactive approach has given the Federation a voice and this has much more significance in bringing about change in the way Government and others look at poor people. The Federation attends meetings with Government in a bid to make their needs and efforts known as well as to negotiate for support. Letters to seek an audience have been written to the town clerk. 

Finance:

SDI Contributions:

SDI contributed US$30,000.00 of which US$5,000.00 was used for project-linked technical assistance. 

Resources Leveraged:

In this instance land had been allocated by Kitwe City Council at a rebate cost from market value. The Federations continue to negotiate with Government for subsidies to complement resources mobilised by the Alliance. 

State Subsidy:

The State subsidy was in the form of technical assistance as well as concessions on house and site plans. 

Market Generated Returns:

None to date. 

Costs recovered from community:

Efforts towards loan repayments are being made with members being consistent with repayments even of small amounts. Despite the struggles members recognise that greater efforts must made. Thus, some have opted to rent part of the space in their homes, and others are hopeful with the onset of the rains, a good harvest will give them the extra income which will help over their loan repayments. Loan repayment rates currently stand at approximately eighty-six percent (86.39%). 

Sustainability is ensured in this project through repayment of loans. The establishment of a revolving fund allows for the number of beneficiaries to increase through the provision of more loans. Savings as a Federation ritual continues to be practiced throughout the project. The savings groups have worked together, planned and strategized on how best to ensure the project is a success.

PPHPZ & ZHPPF. (n.d.). Building City-wide Sanitation Strategies from the Bottom Up: A Situational Analysis for Kitwe, Zambia. [Online]. Available: http://www.shareresearch.org/file/1966/download?token=ZukXjKvZ.
 
UN-HABITAT. (2012). Zambia Urban Housing Sector Profile. [Online]. Available: http://www.iut.nu/Facts%20and%20figures/Africa/Zambia_UrbanHousingProfileUN_Habitat2012.pdf
 
Urban Gateway. (2012). Zambia Holds National Housing Forum. [Online]. Available: http://www.urbangateway.org/content/news/zambia-holds-national-housing-forum

Funding Information

Raised:

$30,000.00

Funding type:

Grant funding

Implementing Partners

Sigrid Rausing Trust


People's Process on Housing & Poverty (PPHPZ)


Zambian Homeless People's Federation